Tag Archives: riveter lab

5th Grade m@k3r Night!

On Thursday March 31st the @RiveterLab hosted the 5th grade class and their parents as they launched into their final trimester of science.  This trimester will see the girls exploring Design & Engineering heavily so what better way to launch than a m@k3r event!

Students and parents had the opportunity to build with TinkeringLabs Electric Motors Catalyst Kits, explore our collection of Little Bits, Build and compete throwing “PowerUp” paper airplanes, and play the video games they created in Scratch using controls they also designed using MakeyMakey.  It was a really fun night of learning for students and parents alike!

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Some Metrics:
40 of 44 girls attended our event and these students were accompanied by 29 Moms, 21 Dads, 17 Siblings, 1 Uncle, 2 Grandparents and 2 Babysitter/Nannies … that’s a total of 112 people that attended our Maker Event! 


An event like this doesn’t just happen; the tireless work of Mr. Wilsey, Ms. Brisson, Mr. Lengel, and the entire Building & Grounds team needs be recognized – as well as the commitment of so many parents to come out and support our program.  Thank you all.

First Grade Inventors in the Riveter Lab!

Last week, the first grade girls came up to the Riveter Lab to IMG_9607learn with littleBits, kits consisting of electronic building blocks that snap together with magnets to create instant circuits. They started with the blue bits (power), a power supply (battery), and a simple LED light. After a little investigation, the girls were able to connect all of the pieces to light up the light. We then added a few more green bits (output) for the girls to explore. In no time, we saw LEDs, buzzers, and motors lighting up, making sounds, and moving at every table. Finally, we added the pink bits (input) to send messages to the green bits. By using the buttons and dimmers, the girls were able to control the intensity of the lights and volume of the buzzers.

IMG_9600More important than the creation of the circuits, the girls were implementing their design thinking skills. They examined the pieces, explored the different ways the pieces fit together, designed their circuits, tested their results, and then made modifications as needed. They worked together with their partners to troubleshoot and problem solve, building on their communication skills. We can’t wait to see what else the first graders create!IMG_9602

post written by C. Windell

Middle School Staff meet the Riveter Lab

On Friday the technology team welcomed the Middle School staff into the Hamlin RosieRiveter Lab to get a look at some of the tools that are in the space.  Our hope is that they can begin to envision integrating these tools into their lessons.  We strive to provide cutting edge tools and know how enabling Hamlin students to demonstrate their understanding in innovative and new ways.

Staff arrived and after a brief introduction they went to learn more in depth about 2 specific tools.  Staff self-selected their sessions and attended two of: 3D printing, Arduino, laser cutting, video production and editing with Green Screens, Circuit Scribe by Electonink, or Autodesk’s Project Ignite platform.  Staff were engaged and using the tools in a hands on way.  We look forward to inviting staff back to the tools knowing that the more they use the tools, the easier it will be for them to see curricular connection for their students.

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Lower School Staff meet the Riveter Lab

On Friday the dedicated and dynamic @hamlin lower school staff were introduced to the Riveter Lab.  The space, refreshed but familiar welcomed them and then they quickly got to work.  Our time was spent being introduced to the new and exciting tools housed within the library, seeing some of them in action, brainstorming how they could be used to help the girls bring their dreams to life, and then a heated competition: to build the highest free standing structure they could using Keva Planks and Strawbees:

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We’re really proud of the accomplishments of these teachers and the fun they had … but it seems we were a ways off the world record: